Teaching my life

There are many reasons I have a passion for adoption, but it would be a lie if I didn’t include my job as one of them. After teaching geography for 10 years now,  I have to answer questions daily about poverty, culture, religion, and stereotypes. When I teach about China, I always show this wonderful video on adoption and children from that country. When teaching about Africa, I talk about extreme poverty and the state of refugees. Don’t get me wrong, I don’t just focus on all of the difficulties that people in this world endure, I love talking about all of the beauty in this world as well, in people, in landforms, and in all of it put together. I try my hardest to show my 8th grade students the amazing parts of this earth, and how they should appreciate all that they have. Sometimes I succeed, and sometimes I fail. But I try nonetheless.

Today is one of those days that I teach my life. With kids not knowing how much it affects me, I am teaching (well, today showing a movie) about Nepal, and people who have tried to conquer Everest. As they show Kathmandu, the people, the prayer flags, the beauty, I quietly shed a tear. Sitting in my classroom with 30+ 8th graders around me, I lose myself in a culture and country that is not my own, and I cry because I want it to become my own, and find that connection with my unknown child.

This is hard.

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2 thoughts on “Teaching my life

  1. If we study geography and other cultures just as a novelty and a curiosity, we will be able to watch movies like the one you showed your class, and then forget it and move on. Only when we study with the understanding that people just like us live in these places, people who may look different and speak strangely and foreign customs, but still people – often with tremendous needs, will we feel the compassion you felt. If we are not moved by our studies to become involved in the world – either ‘radically’ as you are seeking though adoption, or in a myriad of other ways – then we have really learned nothing.

  2. Thanks so much for visiting our blog. I was chuckling to myself because I am a teacher too (well was, before having my kids!) with a passion for history and geography. AND my husband and I began the process to adopt from Nepal about 5 years ago when living in Wales, in a garrison town of British Gurkha soldiers and their families. We ADORE the Nepalese people and (for a few reasons) we were disappointed to be unable to adopt at the time. It would have been perfect, as there were English Second Language teachers in school and loads of Nepalese cultural events and traditions in our little market town in mid-Wales. It was a pretty unique situation! I will read your progress with much interest:) Our best wishes on your adoption (s) and I am off to read more of your beautiful blog entries.

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